Thursday, November 29, 2012

Today's Happy Hour Soundtrack and a Nice Encounter

I'm beginning to feel like it's all Lyle, all the time around here.  That's most certainly the case of late, given the fact our temps are moderate and we have our windows and door wide open, availing ourselves (and the neighbors) of our most excellent stereo system, which is entirely loaded with Lyle at the moment.  This tune is from his brilliant two-disc album, "Step Into This House," wherein Lyle covers tunes by folks that were his inspiration and favorite song writers.  About which, this:
In choosing songs to record, Lovett favored songwriters whose works influenced his own style instead of immensely popular artists whose name recognition might boost sales. The writers selected include Robert Earl Keen, Michael Martin Murphey, Willis Alan Ramsey, and Guy Clark. The second disc is largely dedicated to songs written by Townes Van Zandt and Walter Hyatt, with the final track being a traditional piece. (from The Wiki)
Here's one such tune, written by David Rodriguez:


It's a penny for your thoughts,
It's a dollar for your kisses,
Keep a running tab on the time,
'Cause what I've got the most of
Is what she misses,
The clock is hers,
The hourglass is mine.
Such a beautiful, beautiful tune... expertly rendered.  As for the above... I've pondered the meaning of that lyric for years and I still don't have a definitive answer on that clock/hourglass thang.  But I DO have a clue.

Now... about that encounter.  We made a beer run earlier today and opted to go to our local beer emporium, as opposed to drivin' all the way out to Cannon Airplane Patch.  The beer emporium hired a new girl to wait on the counter and she's a mid-20-sumthin', friendly, lovely, and above all, helpful sort (minor digression: and she's right smack dead center of my personal envelope, too).  She followed me to the coolers and told me they had recently stocked a few new varieties of seasonal beers and would I be interested in seein' those?  "Why, most certainly," sez I, following up with "Do you have Sammy Adams' winter seasonal 12-packs?"  "I think so," sez she, "lemmee check."  And she vanishes into the depths of the cooler, returning with the Adams' Fall 12-pack... which was close, but no cigar.  So we picked up a six o' Abita Amber Ale and a six o' Shiner Hefeweizen and called it good.

The woman told me while I was settlin' up that she'd place an order for a few o' the SA Winter 12-packs, made my change, and sent me on my way with a "C'Ya next time, Darlin'," along with a smile that would light up half o' New Mexico on the darkest o' High Plains nights.  At which point my poor ol' heart went pitty-pat, as we've become used to having Sweet Young Thangs such as she address us as "Sir."  I don't LIKE that, but I've gotten used to it.  I know the girl was just using a figure o' speech, but I'm not too sure she knew she'd made my day.  I might go back and buy more beer tomorrow.

And now it's back out to the verandah to enjoy our 73 degree day.

16 comments:

  1. The lyric - here is my take: a clock does not need to be watched but an hourglass does. She isn't paying attention to the relationship like you are (so to speak).

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  2. The "Sir" thing makes you feel ancient, but being almost 70, I recon I am.
    Since I have grown a full beard, now they even hold the door open for me.
    I look at those young thangs and it reminds me of the car chasing dog, I wouldn't know what to do with it even if I caught it!!!

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    1. I'd know what to do if I caught the car... I'm just not sure I could live up to expectations or past standards. ;-)

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  3. No clock just a thermometer30 November, 2012 04:18

    I think the lyrics have something to do with her legs being in the air.

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  4. Buck, you've got a few years on me, but I still get the "sir" thing (the gray hair, I guess).

    However, there are two gals at a particular retail establishment I frequent that opt for "hon," or "darlin' ". I just love that...

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    1. I think you hear terms of endearment from bar maids a lot more often than women in other professions. Then again, mebbe I spent too much time in bars...

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  5. Yeah, isn't it nice when the young uns treat us as though we were a similar age? Smiles make any day, of course, even for us happily married sorts.

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    1. On the treatment: it's rare, innit?

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  6. I'm not sure what the lyrics mean - Kris may be right. Sounds like time is what the the woman (?) misses or is most concerned with. Anyway, it is a beautiful song.

    I don't mind being called Ma'am, but I hate, I mean HATE, when some young chick calls me sweatie or hon. I've never had a young feller call me sweatie - what's up with that?

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    1. I don't think I'd like it if someone called me sweatie either, Lou. Sweetie's bad enough.

      Sorry. Someone had to do it! :)

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  7. Kris & Lou (You too, Therm): As for the meaning of the lyrics... I suppose you shouldn't take anything out of context. This is another one of those love-lost heartbreak songs and I think one needs to consider the whole. The complete lyrics are here. Now, that said... my take on the song is the relative passage of time: slow for him, normal for her. Alternately, he marks the hours and minutes until she returns, but she owns the date and/or time of the return... if ever.

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  8. Buck, you took the words right out of my mouth regarding the "hourglass" v. "clock" issue. As for the "sweetie," "darlin'," and "honey," kinds of comments from women in the service industry, it's especially common in the South. I worked for three decades at a college and many times heard the middle aged heavy set cafeteria woman say "thanks, honey" as she took my money. She also did that for the President of the college, who was about fifteen years older than I and a lifelong bachelor. He ate that cozy sweetness up, by the way, loved it, you could tell. I still hear the phrase or something like it on those rare times I visit the local Waffle House where the serving lady is as old as I am. As for the "sir," I don't hear it much anymore. In the beginning of my teaching career I heard it all the time, but over the years it gradually faded away. At the end, you were lucky to get a grunt or a nod. I never seem to hear it from people at the grocery or the restaurant, etc. Odd thing is, I still use the "thank you sir," or "thank you ma'am" myself, even to people much younger than I. But I was raised that way.

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    1. But I was raised that way.

      Me, too... and I had my parents' training reenforced in the military.

      It does me good to see you read those lyrics the same way as I do, given you're the master o' such and I'm just a dilettante. ;-)

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